The Great Youth Criminal Justice Act Debate

 

The populist view of youth criminal justice

 

Police searches of young persons on the sidewalk

 

January 2002 - Age of Criminal Responsibility

 

February 2002 - Child Protection or Criminal Justice Model

 

March 2002 - Rights Prior to and During Interrogation

 

April 2002 - Parents' Rights on Arrest of Child

 

September 2002 - School Uniforms

 

November 2002 - Making Adults as Accountable as Young Persons

 

December 2002 - Prosecuting 10 and 11 year olds as criminals

 

January 2003 - Prosecuting 16 and 17 year olds as adults

 

February 2003 - Interrogation of Young Persons

 

March 2003 Zero Tolerance

 

April 2003 Should the Age of Consent be Raised to 18?

 

May 2003 Young Persons Going to Jail

 

June 2003 Preemptive Strikes Against Bullies

 

July 2003 Decriminalization of Marijuana

 

November 2003 Young Criminals Ages 10 and 11

 

December 2003 Extrajudicial Sanctions and Alternative Measures

 

January 2004 Conferences under the YCJA

 

February 2004 Young persons with poor understanding of counsel

 

March 2004 Parents more involved in procedure of YCJA

 

April 2004 Bail release for young persons

 

May 2004 Knowledge of Canadian trial procedures by young persons

 

September 2004 The black and white view of youth criminal justice

 

I

    Read What Others Have Said


    City:
    Mississauga1
    Date:
    15 Oct 2001
    Time:
    14:51:24

    Comments

    I'm glad the name of the new statute does not imply that all young persons are offenders.


    City:
    Ottawa
    Date:
    29 Nov 2001
    Time:
    12:17:55

    Comments

    I believe they should leave the YOA as it is! There is no need for harsher sentences for young people! How can they be accountable for their actions? Take a 15 year old, they are not allowed to drive, we don't let them vote..but we will throw him in the slammer?? I believe these young people need help, prison will make them commit more crimes. All this talk about victims in the new Act.. Let me ask you this? Are these young offenders not victims of circumstance? A child grows up in an abusive alcoholic home and commits a crime, he is punished and thrown in jail, how is this young person compensated for their life of trauma. Why did they commit the crime? The justice system is so worried about compensated the store owner from whom the YO stole from, but what about compensation for this young person's abuse?? Where is the justice? They should also leave sec. 56 alone, young people need the protection, they do not fully understand!

    Anne (Police Foundations Student)


    City:
    London
    Date:
    29 Nov 2001
    Time:
    13:01:59

    Comments

    I think that the young offenders act should stay just the way it is. Teens today get into problems themselves they do not get pushed into making wrong decisions by other people. Even if someone else pushes/peer pressures them into it, that is for the court to decide. Teens need to be punished in some way. There has to be some sort of consequences for their actions and the current Young Offenders Act is just what they need. It shouldn't be changed, it is fine the way it is.


    City:
    Ontario
    Date:
    01 Dec 2001
    Time:
    13:05:18

    Comments

    Youth crimes must have consequences that fit the crime, and at the same time have meaning for the young people and their victims

     


     

     

 

 

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Copyright 2018 Stephen Biss

 

 

Stephen R. Biss, Barrister & Solicitor

470 Hensall Circle, Suite 303
Mississauga, Ontario
L5A 3V4

905-273-3322  or 1-877-273-3322

 


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